Segregated Fund

How to make the best of segregated funds

Segregated funds, also known as seg funds, are specific insurance products in which your funds are invested in underlying assets such as mutual funds for example. Segregated funds differ from mutual funds, however, in that they have a built-in guarantee for either all or part of your investment, potentially offering a more secure option. Generally speaking, you need to have held the investment for a minimum of ten years for this protection to apply and it often costs extra to benefit from this guarantee. You should also be aware that if you withdraw your funds before the maturity date, you will lose this protection and will only receive the current market value of your investment minus applicable charges.

The difference between retail and group retirement plan segregated funds

Often, workplace pensions constitute segregated funds but they work slightly differently to retail segregated funds that you purchase yourself. They usually do not come with the insurance guarantee, nor do they charge such high fees, though they do offer the potential for creditor protection and the possibility of excluding probate fees where applicable.

Here are some of the pros and cons of investing in segregated funds:

Advantages

  • As mentioned above, one of the main benefits is the fact that between 75% and 100% of your investment is protected,as long as you abide by the rules relating to withdrawalsi.e.: your funds must be held for a particular length of time.
  • In addition, many products offer you the opportunity to allow your beneficiaries to receive between 75% and 100% of the contributions that you have made in the event of your death. What’s more, as long as your beneficiaries are named in the contract, they will not pay probate fees.
  • Many funds also offer creditor protection which is useful for those who run their own business.

Disadvantages

  • You will often pay higher management fees for segregated funds compared with mutual funds, due to the added insurance and protection that they offer.
  • You are likely to be penalised if you withdraw your funds before the contract maturity date. Specifically, you will often pay a withdrawal fee and will also not benefit from the protection guarantee. To avoid this, you usually have to keep your monies invested for ten years.

Latest News

Don’t lose all your hard-earned money to taxes

It’s essential to manage your tax planning properly – both while you are living and for after your death. You want as much of your money as possible to go to your beneficiaries, not the government. Our article contains three tips to help you do that: 1. Learn how to make the most of the lifetime capital gains exemption. 2. Figure out ways to decrease your end-of-life tax bill. 3. Look into Immediate Financing Arrangements.

Retirement Planning for Business Owners – Checklist

As a business owner, one of your challenges is learning how to balance between reinvesting into the business and setting money aside for personal savings. Since there are no longer employer-sponsored pension plans and the knowledge that retirement will come eventually, it’s important to have a retirement plan in place. We've put together an infographic checklist that can help you get started on this.

2022 Federal Budget Highlights

On April 7, 2022, the Federal Government released their 2022 budget. Our article contains highlights of the various financial measures in this budget, divided into these sections: • Housing • Alternative minimum tax • Dental care • Small businesses • Tradespeople • Canada Growth Fund • Climate • Bank and insurer taxes

2021 Income Tax Year Tips

It’ll be time to file your 2021 taxes soon, and you must take advantage of every tax credit and deduction that you can. Our article includes information on a variety of subjects you need to know about, including what to do if you’ve had to repay COVID-19 benefits, how to plan ahead if you’re self-employed or retiring soon, and what you need to know if you have a home office or employer-provided benefits.

Permanent versus Term Life Insurance – What are the Differences?

You know you need life insurance – but you’re not sure which kind is best for you. There are two main kinds of life insurance: • Permanent, which lasts for your entire life. Premiums can be more expensive, but you can also use the policy to build up cash value. • Term, which is only good for a set amount of time. Premiums are less expensive, and you cannot build up cash value – but coverage is easy to get and understand. We can help you determine which type of insurance is best for you and how much it will cost you.

Estate Planning for Blended Families

Blended families – where two people get married but have children from previous relationships – are becoming more common. On top of the day-to-day challenges of blending a family, new spouses also have to figure out how to plan their estates, so everyone is properly taken care of. We cover all of the following a blended family must consider while estate planning: • Sharing the Family Home • Make the Most of a Registered Retirement Savings Plan • How to Share Non-Registered Investments and Other Assets • Why It's Important to Select a Good Trustee • The Advantages of Life Insurance for Blended Family Planning

2022 British Columbia Budget Highlights

On February 22, 2022, the B.C. Minister of Finance announced the 2022 budget. We have highlighted the most important financial measures you need to know, with an emphasis on: • Supporting sustainable economic development • Offering stronger healthcare • Expanding child care options and lowering fees • Supporting capital infrastructure • Providing funding for affordable housing • Promoting clean transportation Budget 2022 includes no changes to personal or corporate tax rates.

TFSA versus RRSP – What you need to know to make the most of them in 2022

TFSAs and RRSPs can be significant savings vehicles. To help you understand their differences, we have put together this article to compare: - TFSA versus RRSP - Differences in deposits - TFSA versus RRSP - Differences in withdrawals Understanding the differences between these two types of tax-advantaged accounts can help you better plan for future purchases and your eventual retirement.

2022 Financial Calendar

Looking for an "at a glance" document covering all the important dates you need to know to stay on track with your financial planning in 2022? Our 2022 financial calendar (which you can easily bookmark or print out) makes sure you're always in the loop! It lists important dates, including: • Payments dates for the Canada Child Benefit, CPP, OAS, and the GST/HST credit. • When TFSA contribution room starts again. • Tax filing deadlines. • Charitable contribution deadlines and the last day to contribute to registered investment accounts. • When the Bank of Canada interest rate announcements are.