2024 Financial Calendar

2024 Financial Calendar

Welcome to our 2024 financial calendar! This calendar is designed to help you keep track of important financial dates and deadlines, such as tax filing and government benefit distribution. You can bookmark this page for easy reference or add these dates to your personal calendar to ensure you don’t miss any important financial obligations.

If you need help with your taxes, tax packages will be available starting February 2024. Don’t wait until the last minute to get started on your tax return – make an appointment with your accountant to ensure you’re ready to go when tax season arrives.

Important 2024 Dates to Know

On January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your Tax Free Savings Account opens again. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $7,000.

If you qualify, on January 1, 2024 the contribution room for your First Home Savings Account opens. The maximum contribution for 2024 is $8,000. 

For your Registered Retirement Savings Plan contributions to be eligible for the 2023 tax year, you must make them by February 29, 2024.

GST/HST credit payments will be issued on:  

  • January 5

  • April 5

  • July 5

  • October 4

Canada Child Benefit payments will be issued on the following dates: 

  • January 19

  • February 20

  • March 20

  • April 19

  • May 17

  • June 20

  • July 19

  • August 20

  • September 20

  • October 18

  • November 20

  • December 13

The government will issue Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security payments on the following dates: 

  • January 29

  • February 27

  • March 26

  • April 26

  • May 29

  • June 26

  • July 29

  • August 28

  • September 25

  • October 29

  • November 27

  • December 20

The Bank of Canada will make interest rate announcements on:

  • January 24

  • March 6

  • April 10

  • June 5

  • July 24

  • September 4

  • October 23

  • December 11

April 30, 2024 is the last day to file your personal income taxes, and tax payments are due by this date. This is also the filing deadline for final returns if death occurred between January 1 and October 31, 2023.

May 1 to June 30, 2024 would be the filing deadline for final tax returns if death occurred between November 1 and December 31, 2023. The due date for the final return is six months after the date of death.

The tax deadline for all self-employment returns is June 17, 2024. Payments are due April 30, 2024. 

The final Tax-Free Savings Account, First Home Savings Account, Registered Education Savings Plan and Registered Disability Savings Plan contributions deadline is December 31.

December 31 is also the deadline for 2024 charitable contributions.

December 31 is also the deadline for individuals who turned 71 in 2024 to finish contributing to their RRSPs and convert them into RRIFs.

Please reach out if you have any questions. 

The Health Spending Account for Business Owners and Incorporated Professionals

Are you tired of using your hard-earned after-tax dollars to cover medical expenses? As a business owner, the burden of managing healthcare costs can be overwhelming. However, there’s a little-known solution that can alleviate this financial strain – the Health Spending Account.

Designed specifically for entrepreneurs like you, the Health Spending Account offers a tax-efficient way to manage medical expenses. Say goodbye to paying out of pocket with after-tax dollars for your healthcare needs, and let’s explore the advantages of this specialized account tailored to meet the unique needs of business owners and incorporated professionals.

Who’s eligible?

The Health Spending Account is available to a wide range of businesses, making it an inclusive and flexible solution. Small businesses, professional corporations, and corporations that wish to supplement an existing health plan are all eligible to participate in this program. Whether you run a small family-owned enterprise, a professional practice, or a larger corporate entity, the Health Spending Account can cater to your specific needs and provide valuable healthcare benefits for you and your employees.

What are the benefits?

Tax Deductibility for Corporations

As a business owner or incorporated professional, you know the significance of minimizing tax burdens. The Health Spending Account allows your corporation to make contributions that are 100 percent tax-deductible. By taking advantage of this tax benefit, you can reduce your corporation’s taxable income, resulting in lower overall taxes. This leaves you with more funds to reinvest in your business, expand operations, or reward your hardworking employees.

Tax-Free Benefits for You and Your Employees

The Health Spending Account offers tax-free reimbursements for both you, as the business owner or incorporated professional, and your employees. Any medical expense covered through the account is received as tax-free income. This means you get to retain more of your earnings while providing valuable healthcare benefits to your workforce without increasing their taxable income. It’s a win-win situation that fosters employee satisfaction and loyalty.

No monthly premium to pay and cost-efficient

A Health Spending Account (HSA) offers a highly cost-efficient approach to managing medical expenses, providing individuals and businesses with significant financial advantages. One of the key benefits of an HSA is that there is no monthly premium to pay, unlike traditional health insurance plans. This means that participants can access valuable healthcare benefits without the burden of regular premium payments. With no ongoing costs, the HSA allows individuals and businesses to allocate their funds more strategically, ensuring that their healthcare budget is utilized efficiently. This cost-effective feature makes the Health Spending Account an attractive option for those seeking to optimize their healthcare spending while enjoying comprehensive medical coverage.

How it works

The Health Spending Account simplifies the process of managing healthcare expenses:

1. Employees pay for medical services out of pocket.

2. The employee submits the claim for reimbursement.

3. The claim amount is then reimbursed tax-free through the corporation’s account.

4. The claim is reimbursed to the employee.

This streamlined process eliminates the complexities associated with traditional health insurance plans, saving you time and effort.

To learn more about how a health spending account can benefit you, please reach out today to book a meeting, and we would be happy to help.

Understanding Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs) in Canada

What is an RESP?

A Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) is a unique savings account available in Canada, designed to assist individuals, such as parents or guardians, in saving for a child’s post-secondary education. Notably, anyone can open an RESP for a child. There are two main types of RESPs: single and family plans. Single plans cater to one beneficiary who doesn’t necessarily have to be related to the contributor. In contrast, family plans can cater to multiple beneficiaries, who must be related to the contributor by blood or adoption. This special account type offers significant tax benefits and is structured explicitly to fund a child’s future educational needs.

What are the eligibility requirements to open an RESP?

Opening an RESP requires both the contributor and the beneficiary (the child for whom you’re saving) to be Canadian residents with a valid Social Insurance Number (SIN). The plan can be opened for up to 35 years, and the RESP has a lifetime contribution limit of $50,000. To qualify for the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG), the beneficiary must be aged 17 or under.

How can my child access their RESP funds for school?

The beneficiary can start withdrawing funds from the RESP as Educational Assistance Payments (EAPs) once they enrol in an eligible post-secondary educational program. EAPs comprise the income earned in the RESP and any government grants. The original contributions made to the RESP can be withdrawn tax-free by the contributor or given to the beneficiary. Given the student’s income level and personal tax credits, they typically remain tax-free.

What are the benefits of an RESP?

RESPs offer numerous benefits. Key among them is tax-deferred growth, which means the investment income generated within the account isn’t taxed as long as it remains in the plan. Also, through programs like the CESG and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB), the Canadian government contributes to your RESP, thereby enhancing your savings. Lastly, RESPs provide a structured path to save for a child’s future education, encouraging consistent savings and financial planning.

How does the Canada Education Savings Grant work?

The CESG is a government grant that matches a portion of your annual RESP contributions. The standard matching rate is 20% on the first $2,500 contributed each year, leading to a maximum annual grant of $500. However, low-income families may qualify for a higher matching rate. Unused CESG contribution room can be carried forward, allowing for a potential maximum grant payment of $1,000 in a single year. The CESG is available until the beneficiary turns 17, with a lifetime limit of $7,200 per beneficiary.

What is the Canada Learning Bond?

The Canada Learning Bond (CLB) is another program to promote long-term savings for a child’s post-secondary education. It targets children born after 2003 from low-income families. Eligible families receive an initial $500 from the government, directly deposited into the child’s RESP. An additional $100 is added annually until the child turns 15, for a potential total of $2,000. The CLB does not require any contributions to the RESP, making it accessible even for those in a tight financial position.

What are the BCTESG and QESI?

Provincial programs such as the British Columbia Training and Education Savings Grant (BCTESG) and the Quebec Education Savings Incentive (QESI) provide additional incentives for education savings. The BCTESG offers a one-time grant of $1,200 for eligible children, and the QESI provides a refundable tax credit paid directly into an RESP for qualifying Quebec residents.

How do I open an RESP?

Opening an RESP can be done through a financial advisor. You need to provide your SIN and the SIN of the beneficiary. Understanding the terms, conditions, and potential fees linked with the RESP offered by your chosen institution is crucial. You can make regular contributions or contribute lump sums as you see fit. Inquiring about the types of investments available within the RESP is vital, as they can significantly impact the growth of your savings.

In conclusion, while RESPs offer a structured and tax-efficient way of saving for a child’s post-secondary education, they also require careful planning and consistent contributions. Be sure to understand all aspects of an RESP and consider contacting us before starting one.

British Columbia 2023 Budget Highlights

On February 28, 2023, the B.C. Minister of Finance announced the province’s 2023 budget. This article highlights the most important things you need to know about this budget.

No Changes To Corporate or Personal Tax Rates

There are no changes to the province’s personal or corporate tax rates in Budget 2023.

Tax Credits Changes

Budget 2023 extends two corporate tax credits – the Farmers’ Food Donation Tax Credit until 2026 and the Interactive Digital Media Tax Credit to August 31, 2028.

As of July 1, 2023, the maximum annual Climate Action Tax Credit will be increased to $447 for an adult, $223.50 for a spouse or common-law partner, and $111.50 per child.

Renters with household incomes under $60,000 can apply for a new refundable Renter’s Tax Credit up to a maximum of $400. Renters with a household income of over $60,000 and less than $80,000 are eligible for a reduced credit.

Increased B.C Family Benefit

The B.C Family Benefit will increase as of July 1, 2023:

• The maximum annual benefit is now $1,750 for a family’s first child, $1,100 for a second child, and $900 for each subsequent child for families with an adjusted net income of under $27,354.

• The minimum benefit will now be $775 for a family’s first child, $750 for a second child, and $725 for each subsequent child for families with an adjusted family net income of more than $27,354 and less than $87,533.

The budget also includes a maximum annual supplement of $500 to single-parent families on top of the maximum annual benefit.

Carbon Tax Changes

Effective April 1, 2023, carbon tax rates will increase annually by $15 per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions. Qualifying commercial greenhouse growers will be eligible for a reduced point-of-sale reduced carbon tax on purchases of natural gas and propane.

The 2023 budget verifies that B.C. plans to implement an output-based pricing system (OBPS) that meets updated federal requirements to replace the current carbon pricing as of April 1, 2024.

Other Tax Changes

The budget introduces new taxation rules for online marketplace services and now excludes automated external defibrillators from provincial sales taxes.

Budget 2023 indicates refund rates for International Fuel Tax Agreement licensees will increase effective April 1, 2023. New purpose-built rental buildings will be exempt from the further 2% property transfer tax applied to transactions that exceed $3 million as of January 1, 2024.

Healthcare and Housing Spending

Budget 2023 contains several commitments to support health care and housing:

  • Various contraception options, including birth control prescriptions, will be free as of April 1, 2023.

  • One billion dollars has been committed to new treatment beds and treatment support for mental health and addictions.

  • $2.3 billion will go towards enhancing core services, recruiting staff, implementing a new pay model for family doctors, and fighting COVID-19.

  • In housing, $1.1 billion will be used to purchase land near transit hubs and improve student housing.

  • Over $569 million will be allocated to building projects and $454 million towards homelessness support and response programs.

We can help!

Wondering how this year’s budget will impact your finances or your business? We can help – give us a call today!

Federal Budget 2021 Highlights

On April 19, 2021, the Federal Government released their 2021 budget. We have broken down the highlights of the financial measures in this budget into three different sections:

  • Business Owners

  • Personal Tax Changes

  • Supplementary Highlights

Business Owners

Extending Covid -19 Emergency Business Supports

All of the following COVID-19 Emergency Business Supports will be extended from June 5, 2021, to September 25, 2021, with the subsidy rates gradually decreasing:

  • Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) – The maximum wage subsidy is currently 75%. It will decrease down to 60% for July, 40% for August, and 20% for September.

  • Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (CERS) – The maximum rent subsidy is currently 65%. It will decrease down to 60% for July, 40% for August, and 20% for September.

  • Lockdown Support Program – The Lockdown Support Program rate of 25% will be extended from June 4, 2021, to September 25, 2021.

Only organizations with a decline in revenues of more than 10% will be eligible for these programs as of July 4, 2021. The budget also includes legislation to give the federal government authority to extend these programs to November 20, 2021, should either the economy or the public health situation make it necessary.

Canada Recovery Hiring Program

The federal budget introduced a new program called the Canada Recovery Hiring Program. The goal of this program is to help qualifying employers offset costs taken on as they reopen. An eligible employer can claim either the CEWS or the new subsidy, but not both.

The proposed subsidy will be available from June 6, 2021, to November 20, 2021, with a subsidy of 50% available from June to August. The Canada Recovery Hiring Program subsidy will decrease down to 40% for September, 30% for October, and 20% for November.

Interest Deductibility Limits

The federal budget for 2021 introduces new interest deductibility limits. This rule limits the amount of net interest expense that a corporation can deduct when determining its taxable income. The amount will be limited to a fixed ratio of its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (sometimes referred to as EBITDA).

The fixed ratio will apply to both existing and new borrowings and will be phased in at 40% as of January 1, 2023, and 30% for January 1, 2024.

Support for small and medium-size business innovation

The federal budget also includes 4 billion dollars to help small and medium-sized businesses innovate by digitizing and taking advantage of e-commerce opportunities. Also, the budget provides additional funding for venture capital start-ups via the Venture Capital Catalyst Program and research that will support up to 2,500 innovative small and medium-sized firms.

Personal Tax Changes

Tax treatment and Repayment of Covid-19 Benefit Amounts

The federal budget includes information on both the tax treatment and repayment of the following COVID-19 benefits:

  • Canada Emergency Response Benefits or Employment Insurance Emergency Response Benefits

  • Canada Emergency Student Benefits

  • Canada Recovery Benefits, Canada Recovery Sickness Benefits, and Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefits

Individuals who must repay a COVID-19 benefit amount can claim a deduction for that repayment in the year they received the benefit (by requesting an adjustment to their tax return), not the year they repaid it. Anyone considered a non-resident for income tax purposes will have their COVID-19 benefits included in their taxable income.

Disability Tax Credit

Eligibility changes have been made to the Disability Tax Credit. The criteria have been modified to increase the list of mental functions considered necessary for everyday life, expand the list of what can be considered when calculating time spent on therapy, and reduce the requirement that therapy is administered at least three times each week to two times a week (with the 14 hours per week requirement remaining the same).

Old Age Security

The budget enhances Old Age Security (OAS) benefits for recipients who will be 75 or older as of June 2022. A one-time, lump-sum payment of $500 will be sent out to qualifying pensioners in August 2021, with a 10% increase to ongoing OAS payments starting on July 1, 2022.

Waiving Canada Student Loan Interest

The budget also notes that the government plans to introduce legislation that will extend waiving of any interest accrued on either Canada Student Loans or Canada Apprentice Loans until March 31, 2023.

Support for Workforce Transition

Support to help Canadians transition to growing industries was also included in the budget. The support is as follows:

  • $250 million over three years to Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to help workers upskill and redeploy to growing industries.

  • $298 million over three years for the Skills for Success Program to provide training in skills for the knowledge economy.

  • $960 million over three years for the Sectoral Workforce Solutions Program to help design and deliver training relevant to the needs of small and medium businesses.

Supplementary Highlights

Federal Minimum Wage

The federal budget also introduces a proposed federal minimum wage of $15 per hour that would rise with inflation.

New Housing Rebate

The GST New Housing Rebate conditions will be changed. Previously, if two or more individuals were buying a house together, all of them must be acquiring the home as their primary residence (or that of a relation) to qualify for the GST New Housing Rebate. Now, the GST New Housing Rebate will be available as long as one of the purchasers (or a relation of theirs) acquires the home as their primary place of residence. This will apply to all agreements of purchase and sale entered into after April 19, 2021.

Unproductive use of Canadian Housing by Foreign Non-Resident Owners

A new tax was introduced in the budget on unproductive use of Canadian housing by non-resident foreign owners. This tax will be a 1% tax on the value of non-resident, non-Canadian owned residential real estate considered vacant or underused. This tax will be levied annually starting in 2022.

All residential property owners in Canada (other than Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada) must also file an annual declaration for the prior calendar year with the CRA for each Canadian residential property they own, starting in 2023. Filing the annual declaration may qualify owners to claim an exemption from the tax on their property if they can prove the property is leased to qualified tenants for a minimum period in a calendar year.

Excise Duty on Vaping and Tobacco

The budget also includes a new proposal on excise duties on vaping products and tobacco. The proposed framework would consist of:

  • A single flat rate duty on every 10 millilitres of vaping liquid as of 2022

  • An increase in tobacco excise duties by $4 per carton of 200 cigarettes and increases to the excise duty rates for other tobacco products such as tobacco sticks and cigars as of April 20, 2021.

Luxury Goods Tax

Finally, the federal budget proposed introducing a tax on certain luxury goods for personal use as of January 1, 2022.

  • For luxury cars and personal aircraft, the new tax is equal to the lesser of 10% of the vehicle’s total value or the aircraft, or 20% of the value above $100,000.

  • For boats over $250,000, the new tax is equal to the lesser of 10% of the full value of the boat or 20% of the value above $250,000.

If you have any questions or concerns about how the new federal budget may impact you, call us – we’d be happy to help you!

Business Owners: 2020 Tax Planning Tips for the End of the Year

It’s a great time to review your business finances now that we are nearing year-end. Your business may be affected by recent tax changes or new measures to help with financial losses due to COVID-19. Figuring out the tax ramifications of these new measures can be complicated, so please don’t hesitate to consult your accountant and us to determine how this may affect your business finances.

We’re assuming that your corporate year-end is December 31. If it’s not, then this information will be useful when your business year-end comes up.

Below, we have listed some of the critical areas to consider and provide you with some helpful guidelines to make sure that you cover all the essentials. We have divided our tax planning tips into four sections:

  • Year-end tax checklist

  • Remuneration

  • Business tax

  • Estate

Business Year-End Tax Checklist

Remuneration

  • Salary/dividend mix

  • Accruing your salary/bonus

  • Stock option plan

  • Tax-free amounts

  • Paying family members

  • COVID-19 wage subsidy measures for employers

Business Tax

  • Claiming the small business deduction

  • Shareholder loans

  • Passive investment income including eligible and ineligible dividends

  • Corporate reorganization

Estate

  • Will review

  • Succession plan

  • Lifetime capital gains exemption

Remuneration

What is your salary and dividend mix?

Individuals who own incorporated businesses can elect to receive their income as either salary or as dividends. Your choice will depend on your situation. Consider the following factors:

  • Your current and future cash flow needs

  • Your personal income level

  • The corporation’s income level

  • Tax on income splitting (TOSI) rules. When TOSI rules apply, be aware that dividends are taxed at the highest marginal tax rate.

  • Passive investment income rules

Also consider the difference between salary and dividends:

Salary

  • Can be used for RRSP contribution

  • Reduces corporate tax bill

  • Subject to payroll tax

  • Subject to CPP contribution

  • Subject to EI contribution

Dividend

  • Does not provide RRSP contribution

  • Does not reduce a corporate tax bill

  • No tax withholdings

  • No CPP contribution

  • No EI Insurance contribution

  • Depending on the province¹, receive up to $50,000 of eligible dividends at a low tax rate provided you have no other sources of income

¹The amount and tax rate will vary based on province/territory you live in.

It’s worth considering ensuring that you receive a salary high enough to take full advantage of the maximum RRSP annual contribution that you can make. For 2020, salaries of $154,611 will provide the maximum RRSP room of $27,830 for 2021.

Is it worth accruing your salary or bonus this year?

You could consider accruing your salary or bonus in the current year but delaying payment of it until the following year. If your company’s year-end is December 31, your corporation will benefit from a deduction for the year 2020. The source deductions are not required to be remitted until actual salary or bonus payment in 2021.

Stock Option Plan

If your compensation includes stock options, check if you will be affected by the stock option rules that went into effect on January 1, 2020. These new rules cap the amount of specific employee stock options eligible for the stock option deduction at $200,000 as of January 1, 2020. These rules will not affect you if a Canadian controlled private corporation grants your stock options.

Tax-Free Amounts

If you own your corporation, pay yourself tax-free amounts if you can. Here are some ways to do so:

  • Pay yourself rent if the company occupies space in your home.

  • Pay yourself capital dividends if your company has a balance in its capital dividend account.

  • Return “paid-up capital” that you have invested in your company

Do you employ members of your family?

Employing and paying a salary to family members who work for your incorporated business is worth considering. You could receive a tax deduction against the salary you pay them, providing that the salary is “reasonable” with the work done. In 2020, the individual can earn up to $13,229 (increased for 2020 from $12,298) and pay no federal tax. This also provides the individual with RRSP contribution room, CPP and allows for child-care deductions. Bear in mind there are additional costs incurred when employing someone, such as payroll taxes and contributions to CPP.

COVID-19 wage subsidy measures for employers

To deal with the financial hardships introduced by COVID-19, the federal government introduced two wage subsidy measures:

  • The Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) program. With this, you can receive a subsidy of up to 85% of eligible remuneration that you paid between March 15 and December 19, 2020, if you had a decrease in revenue over this period. You must submit your application for the CEWS no later than January 31, 2021.

  • The Temporary Wage Subsidy (TWS) program. With this program, which reduces the amount of payroll deductions you needed to remit to the CRA, you can qualify for a subsidy equal to 10% of any remuneration that you paid between March 18, 2020, and June 19, 2020. You can claim up to a maximum of $1,375 per employee and $25,000 in total.

You can apply for both programs if you are eligible. If you qualify for the TWS but did not reduce your payroll remittances, you can still apply. The CRA will then either pay the subsidy amount to you or transfer it over to your next year’s remittance.

Business Tax

Claiming the Small Business Deduction

Are you able to claim a small business deduction? The federal small business tax rate decreased to 9% in 2019. It did not increase in 2020, nor is it expected to increase in 2021. From a provincial level, there will be changes in the following provinces:

Therefore, a small business deduction in 2020 is worth more than in 2021 for these provinces.

Should you repay any shareholder loans?

Borrowing funds from your corporation at a low or zero interest rate means that you are considered to have received a taxable benefit at the CRA’s 1% prescribed interest rate, less actual interest that you pay during the year or thirty days after the end of the year. You need to include the loan in your income tax return unless it is repaid within one year after the end of your corporation’s taxation year.

For example, if your company has a December 31 year-end and loaned you funds on November 1, 2020, you must repay the loan by December 31, 2021; otherwise, you will need to include the loan as taxable income on your 2020 personal tax return.

Passive investment income

If your corporation has a December year-end, then 2020 will be the second taxation year that the current passive investment income rules may apply to your company.

New measures were introduced in the 2018 federal budget relating to private businesses, which earn passive investment income in a corporation that also operates an active business.

There are two key parts to this:

  • Limiting access to dividend refunds. Essentially, a private company will be required to pay ineligible dividends to receive dividend refunds on some taxes. In the past, these could have been refunded when an eligible dividend was paid.

  • Limiting the small business deduction. This means that, for impacted companies, the small business deduction will be reduced at a rate of $5 for every $1 of investment income over $50,000. It is eliminated if investment income exceeds $150,000. Ontario and New Brunswick are not following these federal rules. Therefore, the provincial small business deduction is still available for income up to $500,000 annually.

Suppose your corporation earns both active business and passive investment income. In that case, you should contact your accountant and us directly to determine if there are any planning opportunities to minimize the new passive investment income rules’ impact. For example, you can consider a “buy and hold” strategy to help defer capital gains.

Think about when to pay dividends and dividend type

When choosing to pay dividends in 2020 or 2021, you should consider the following:

  • Difference between the yearly tax rate

  • Impact of tax on split income

  • Impact of passive investment income rules

Except for two provinces, Quebec and Alberta, the combined top marginal tax rates will not change from 2020 to 2021 at a provincial level. Therefore, it will not make a difference for most locations if you choose to pay in 2020 or 2021.

In Quebec and Alberta, as there will be increases in the combined marginal tax rate, you will have potential tax savings available if you choose to pay dividends in 2020 rather than 2021.

When deciding to pay a dividend, you will need to decide whether to pay out eligible or ineligible dividends. Consider the following:

  • Dividend refund claim limits: Eligible refundable dividend tax on hand (ERDTOH) vs Ineligible Refundable dividend tax on hand (NRDTOH)

  • Personal marginal tax rate of eligible vs. ineligible dividends (see chart below)

Given the passive investment income rules, typically, it makes sense to pay eligible dividends to deplete the ERDTOH balance before paying ineligible dividends. (Please note that ineligible dividends can also trigger a refund from the ERDTOH account.)

Eligible dividends are taxed at a lower personal tax rate than ineligible dividends (based on top combined marginal tax rate). However, keep in mind that when ineligible dividends are paid out, they are subject to the small business deduction; therefore, the dividend gross-up is 15% while eligible dividends are subject to the general corporate tax rate, a dividend gross-up is 38%. It’s important to talk to a professional to determine what makes the most sense when selecting the type of dividend to pay out of your corporation.

Corporate Reorganization

It might be time to revisit your corporate structure, given recent changes to private corporation rules on income splitting and passive investment income to provide more control on dividend income distribution.

Before you issue dividends to other shareholders in your private company (this includes your spouse, children, or other relatives), review the TOSI rules’ impact with us or your tax and legal advisors.

Another reason to reassess your structure is to segregate investment assets from your operating company for asset protection. You don’t want to trigger TOSI, so make sure you structure this properly. If you are considering succession planning, this is the time to evaluate your corporate structure as well.

Another aspect of corporate reorganization can be loss consolidation – where you consolidate losses from within related corporate groups.

Estate

Ensure your will is up to date

If your estate plan includes an intention for your family members to inherit your business using a trust, ensure that this plan is still tax-effective; income tax changes from January 1, 2016 eliminated the taxation at graduated rates in testamentary trusts and now taxes these trusts at the top marginal personal income tax rate. Review your will to ensure that any private company shares that you intend to leave won’t be affected by the most recent TOSI rules.

Succession plan

Consider a succession plan to ensure your business is transferred to your children, key employees or outside party in a tax-efficient manner.

Lifetime Capital Gains Exemption

If you sell your qualified small business corporation shares, you can qualify for the lifetime capital gains exemption (In 2020, the exemption is $883,384), where the gain is entirely exempt from tax. The exemption is a cumulative lifetime exemption; therefore, you don’t have to claim the entire amount at once.

The issues we discussed above can be complicated. Contact your accountant and us if you have any questions. We can help.